Catechism 


What is idolatry?

    Idolatry is trusting in created things rather than the Creator for our hope and happiness, significance and security.

    Romans 1:21 and 25

    For although they knew God, they did not honor him as God or give thanks to him, but they became futile in their thinking, and their foolish hearts were darkened…. They exchanged the truth about God for a lie and worshiped and served the creature rather than the Creator.

    Catechism


    What is sin?

      Sin is rejecting or ignoring God in the world he created, rebelling against him by living without reference to him, not being or doing what he requires in his law—resulting in our death and the disintegration of all creation.

      1 John 3:4

      Everyone who makes a practice of sinning also practices lawlessness; sin is lawlessness.

      Still rolls the stone away 


      For some of you today will be another day of labor, some of you today will be a flurry of activity consisting of new clothes and going to church.  Some of you will be going over your notes making sure your sermon is ready.  Some of you will be meeting in secret in fear of your lives.  Some of you will still be in bed.

      But consider this, because of a Sunday over 1900 years ago something changed the world.  Because of this one event nothing is the same any more.  Calendars are no longer in reference to cities or other events  Anno Domini began.  Because the tomb was empty, because the stone was rolled away nothing is ever the same.  

      And that is the good news.  It is good news because Christ being raised was for our justification (Rom. 4:25).  Christ being raised has delivered us from God’s coming wrath. (1 Thess. 1:10)  Christ being raised from the dead he is now interceding for us. (Rom. 8:34)  Because Christ was raised we too will be raised from the dead. (1 Cor. 6:14)  Christ being raised we too will be in  the presence of God. (2 Cor. 4:14)  Because being raised he now rules being given authority over all things. (Eph. 1:20-22)

      So today let us echo the proclaimation:  Christ has risen! He has risen indeed! Amen.

      Resurrection Sunday 2017

      Good​ Friday


      1 Peter 2:24

      He himself bore our sins in his body on the tree, that we might die to sin and live to righteousness. By his wounds you have been healed. 

      Who his own self bare our sins This form of speaking is fitted to set forth the efficacy of Christ’s death. For as under the Law, the sinner, that he might be released from guilt, substituted a victim in his own place; so Christ took on himself the curse due to our sins, that he might atone for them before God. And he expressly adds, on the tree, because he could not offer such an expiation except on the cross. Peter, therefore, well expresses the truth, that Christ’s death was a sacrifice for the expiation of our sins; for being fixed to the cross and offering himself a victim for us, he took on himself our sin and our punishment. Isaiah, from whom Peter has taken the substance of his doctrine, employs various forms of expression, — that he was smitten by God’s hand for our sins, that he was wounded for our iniquities, that he was afflicted and broken for our sake, that the chastisement of our peace was laid on him. But Peter intended to set forth the same thing by the words of this verse, even that we are reconciled to God on this condition, because Christ made himself before his tribunal a surety and as one guilty for us, that he might suffer the punishment due to us.~John Calvin Commentary

      Lest, however, we should think that the patience of our Lord was intended to be our example and nothing more, the apostle goes on to speak expressly of the expiatory nature of the sufferings alluded to. He has held up the Savior in all His woes as our example, but knowing the evil tendency of skeptical minds, by any means, to becloud the cross, he now puts aside the example, for a moment, and speaks of the Redeemer as the great sacrifice for sin. The sacred writers are always very clear and distinct upon this truth and so must we be. There is no preaching the gospel if the atonement is left out. No matter how well we speak of Jesus as a pattern, we have done nothing unless we point Him out as the substitute and sin-bearer. We must, in fact, continually imitate the apostle, and speak plainly of Him, “Who His own self bore our sins in His own body on the tree.”~Charles Spurgeon

      Catechism 


      Since no one can keep the law, what is its purpose?

        That we may know the holy nature and will of God, and the sinful nature and disobedience of our hearts; and thus our need of a Savior. The law also teaches and exhorts us to live a life worthy of our Savior.

        Romans 3:20

        For by works of the law no human being will be justified in God’s sight, since through the law comes knowledge of sin.

        Catechism


        Did God create us unable to keep his law?

          No, but because of the disobedience of our first parents, Adam and Eve, all of creation is fallen; we are all born in sin and guilt, corrupt in our nature and unable to keep God’s law.

          Romans 5:12

          Therefore, just as sin came into the world through one man, and death through sin, and so death spread to all men because all sinned.

          Catechism


          Can anyone keep the law of God perfectly?

            Since the fall, no mere human has been able to keep the law of God perfectly, but consistently breaks it in thought, word, and deed.

            Romans 3:10–12

            None is righteous, no, not one; no one understands; no one seeks for God. All have turned aside; together they have become worthless; no one does good, not even one.